innovation in metadata design, implementation & best practice

DCMI Virtual: Presentations

Keynote
Speaker


	Stuart Weibel
Stuart Weibel
Stuart Weibel was a co-organizer of the early Dublin Core workshops and conferences. He helped bring a loosely-organized collection of global expertise together to form the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative and directed it for the first decade of its existence. The effort began with a conversation at the second World Wide Web conference in Chicago in 1994, lamenting the difficulty of finding web resources. Weibel and Eric Miller offered to organize a workshop to explore models of resource description on the Web. Fifty-two web technologists, librarians, and content specialists gathered in Dublin, Ohio in March of 1995, and thus began the workshop and conference series that we reprise in this online symposium. Weibel worked in Research for 25 years at OCLC, a global library cooperative. He left in 2012 to sail and maintain a traditional 26-foot wooden gaff cutter. That is the varnished truth.
Abstract
(coming soon)
Tutorials
Speaker(s)


	Glen Robson
Glen Robson
Glen works as the IIIF Technical Coordinator which is a position funded by an international consortium of institutions created to sustain and develop the IIIF standards. His main roles is to provide assistance with people who are just starting with IIIF and has run many remote and in person workshops around the world. Before working for the IIIF Consortium he spent many years at the National Library of Wales and was involved in making their digitised collections of Maps, Manuscripts, Photographs and Newspapers available through IIIF. He has a keen interest in Linked Data and in particular linked data created through crowdsourcing.

Abstract
Access to image-based and A/V resources is fundamental to research, scholarship and the transmission of cultural knowledge. Digital images are containers for much of the information content in the Web-based delivery of books, newspapers, manuscripts, maps, scrolls and archival materials. Yet much of the Internet’s resources are locked up in silos, with access restricted to bespoke, locally built applications. A growing community of the world’s leading research libraries and content repositories have embarked on an effort to collaboratively produce an interoperable technology and community framework for image and AV delivery. IIIF (International Image Interoperability Framework) has the following goals; To give scholars an unprecedented level of uniform and rich access to digital resources hosted around the world, to define a set of common application programming interfaces that support interoperability between image repositories, and to develop, cultivate and document shared technologies, such as image servers and web clients, that provide a world-class user experience in viewing, comparing, manipulating and annotating images.” (https://iiif.io) and with the release of IIIF version 3.0 these benefits are extended to Audio and Video resources. This lecture will introduce the basic concepts and technologies that make IIIF possible and also discuss the underlying linked data standards that makes the interoperability possible. The lecture will be open to beginners right through to experts and will point those that are interested in getting hands on experience to self guided workshops and support from the wider IIIF Community.
Speaker(s)


	Osma Suominen
Osma Suominen
Osma Suominen is working as an information systems specialist at the National Library of Finland. He is currently working on automated subject indexing, in particular the Annif tool and the Finto AI service, as well as the publishing of bibliographic data as Linked Data. He is also one of the creators of the Finto.fi thesaurus and ontology service and is leading development of the Skosmos vocabulary browser used in Finto. Osma Suominen earned his doctoral degree at Aalto University while doing research on semantic portals and quality of controlled vocabularies within the FinnONTO series of projects.



	Koraljka Golub
Koraljka Golub
Koraljka Golub is a Professor in Library and Information Science at Linnaeus University. She is the head of the institute, Linnaeus University’s iSchool and program coordinator for the Master’s in Digital Humanities. Her research focuses on manual, automatic and collaborative approaches to knowledge organization for the purposes of information retrieval. She has worked on research projects related to automatic subject indexing using thesauri and classification schemes, both subject specific (Engineering Index) and general (Dewey Decimal Classification, Library of Congress Subject Headings). Established evaluation models for automated subject indexing as well as their more complex alternatives have also been a focus of her research.



	Annemieke Romein
Annemieke Romein
Annemieke Romein is a post-doctoral researcher at the KNAW Huygens Institute for Dutch History. She is an early modern historian, who works on the intersection of political and legal history as well as digital humanities. Her research focuses on early modern legislation from a comparative perspective. Her current project - ‘A Game of Thrones?’ - deals with how governance in three early modern republics (Berne, Holland and Gelderland) dealt with issues of order. In 2019 she was a Researcher-in-Residence at the KB National Library of the Netherlands where she worked with Sara Veldhoen and Michel de Gruijter on automatic metadating of individual laws in early modern volumes of ordinances.



	Sara Veldhoen
Sara Veldhoen
Sara Veldhoen works as a research software engineer at the research department of the KB, national library of the Netherlands. She is an active member of a research group that explores possibilities around automated metadata generation to assist the people who catalogue publications, with a focus on subject indexing, using Annif, and author indexing. She is also involved in the KB's Researcher-in-Residence programme, where she works together with external researchers on projects they propose, like that of Annemieke Romein. Sara Veldhoen holds a master's degree in Artificial Intelligence from the University of Amsterdam, where she studied compositionality of language in neural networks.

Abstract
Manually indexing documents for subject-based access is a very labour-intensive intellectual process. A machine could perform similar subject indexing much faster. In this series of presentations and demonstrations, we will show practical examples of automated subject indexing and discuss how such systems can be evaluated. In the first part of this presentation, Osma Suominen will introduce the general idea of automated subject indexing using a controlled vocabulary such as a thesaurus or a classification system; and the open source automated subject indexing tool Annif, which integrates several different machine learning algorithms for text classification. By combining multiple approaches, Annif can be adapted to different settings. The tool can be used with any vocabulary; and, with suitable training data, documents in many different languages may be analysed. Annif is both a command line tool and a microservice-style API service which can be integrated with other systems. We will demonstrate how to use Annif to train a model using metadata from an existing bibliographic database and how it can then provide subject suggestions for new, unseen documents. In the second part of the presentation, Koraljka Golub will discuss the topic of evaluating automated subject indexing systems. There are many challenges in evaluation, for example the lack of gold standards to compare against, the inherently subjective nature of subject indexing, relatively low inter-indexer consistency in typical settings, and dominating out-of-context, laboratory-like evaluation approaches. In the third part of the presentation, Annemieke Romein and Sara Veldhoen will present a case study of how they have applied Annif in a Digital Humanities research project to categorize early modern legislative texts using a hierarchical subject vocabulary and a pre-trained set.
Panels
Speaker(s)


	Erin Antognoli
Erin Antognoli
Erin Antognoli is the lead metadata librarian and data curation team lead in the Knowledge Services Division of the USDA National Agricultural Library (NAL) in Beltsville, Maryland. She coordinates the strategy and application of a variety of metadata standards relevant to both United States federal data and agricultural data, including displayed expertise in ISO 19115 for geospatial data, DataCite, and Project Open Data. Antognoli has contributed to the development and improvement of the Ag Data Commons repository and GeoData catalog to promote FAIR data at NAL for over five years. She also serves as co-chair of the CENDI Data Curation Discussion Group, which consists of senior information managers from a variety of United States federal agencies.



	Fabrizio Celli
Fabrizio Celli
Fabrizio Celli received the MSc in Computer Science and Engineering from the University of Rome "Roma Tre" in 2009. He also received the BSc in Psychology from the University of Rome "La Sapienza" in 2015. Currently working for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), he has 11 years of experience as a software engineer. His major skills are web application development, search engines, linked open data, big data, machine learning, and IT security. He has interests in Neuroscience and Theoretical Physics.



	Xiaojing Qin
Xiaojing Qin
Xiaojing Qin is the supervisor of knowledge and information management team. She works at the Institute of Agricultural Information and Economics (AIE), Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences (BAAFS) in China. She responsible for the construction of agricultural information resources, data sharing, information analysis, and semantic technology research.



	Medha Devare
Medha Devare
Medha Devare is Senior Research Fellow at IFPRI and leads one of the three Modules of the CGIAR Platform for Big Data in Agriculture, spearheading efforts to operationalize the FAIR Principles towards Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable data across CGIAR’s 13 Centers. Prior to this she led the CGIAR System‘s Open Access/Open Data Initiative from the CGIAR System Office in France. Medha is an agronomist and microbial ecologist with experience working on and leading projects addressing food and nutritional security and sustainable resource management in South Asia. She also has experience in data management and semantic web standards and tools.



	Laura Meggiolaro
Laura Meggiolaro
Over the past 16 years, Laura has been specialising in knowledge management for development with an increasing passion for the information ecology and data ecosystem that characterises the land governance sector where she focuses on enhancing land data discoverability and interoperability through open standards and semantic technologies. She holds a master in communication sciences and a master in economics for developments. Since 2011, Laura has been responsible for the overall management, implementation and expansion of the Land Portal.

Abstract
Panelists will be from FAO, CGIAR, Land Portal Foundation, USDA and Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry Sciences
Speaker(s)


	Andrew Pace
Andrew Pace



	Jeanette Norris
Jeanette Norris



	Brian Dobreski
Brian Dobreski

Abstract
A panel of practitioner, educator, and researcher to discuss workflows and ontological models in transforming metadata structures and creating digital disruptions for keeping cultural memory live (e.g., archival materials, covid-19 memory).
Speaker(s)


	Adrian Pohl
Adrian Pohl
Adrian (@acka47) has been working at the North-Rhine Westphalian Library Service Centre (hbz) in Cologne, Germany since 2008. He is responsible for the project management and the RDF data modeling of hbz’s linked open data service ​lobid.​ Adrian initiated the establishment of a German-speaking w​ orking group for OER metadata​ within the Competence Center for Interoperable Metadata (KIM) of the German Initiative for Network Information (DINI). Currently, he is involved in the development of an ​OER Search Index (OERSI)​ where his focus is on ETL processes. In the context of the OERSI project, he initiated the development of an LRMI profile within KIM to be used as OERSI index schema and as a recommendation for OER providers in the German-speaking world.



	Steve Midgley
Steve Midgley
Steve Midgley is the founder and managing director of Learning Tapestry, an educational innovation company. Previously, he served as Deputy Director of Educational Technology for Arne Duncan at the US Department of Education, advising on education technology, interoperability standards and educational broadband infrastructure. He also served as the Director of Education at the FCC, where he headed the team that developed the Education policy for the National Broadband Plan. Steve is active on the boards of the nonprofit Literacy Lab and the foundation RaiseYou, and is an investor to and on the board of several for-profit organizations as well. Prior to government service, Steve ran the technology consulting firm Mixrun, providing consulting CTO services to organizations including the California Department of Education, Pearson, Amplify, the Gates Foundation, the Hewlett Foundation, the MacArthur Foundation, and Danny Hillis’ Applied Minds.



	Brandt Redd
Brandt Redd
Brandt Redd is CTO for MatchMaker Ed Labs and coordinator of the EdMatrix directory of Learning Standards. He is a recognized authority in Learning Technology Strategy with expertise in personalized learning, competency-based learning, computer-adaptive assessment, and standards. Recently, Redd served as CIO at the Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium and, prior to that, as Senior Technology Officer for Education at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. His experience includes serving as CTO, chief scientist, senior software engineer, DBA, and co-founding two successful software companies. Redd is co-inventor of three patents.

Abstract
The Learning Resource Metadata Initiative (LRMI) has defined a set of classes, properties and concept schemes for describing the educational characteristics of learning resources. These terms have been part of schema.org for several years, where they sit alongside other terms useful in educational resource description. The L​ RMI task group of DCMI​ continues its work to promote the use and improve the utility of LRMI metadata in the context of other efforts in education data management. This panel session is intended for anyone interested in describing learning resources using LRMI or using such metadata to create services for the management, dissemination, discovery, use and reuse of learning resources. It will start with a brief overview of LRMI as an introduction for anyone not familiar with it, and will include presentations from projects that have used LRMI in a national context to describe OER, to make curriculum content more reusable, and to match learning resources to learning objectives. We will describe how LRMI is currently being used in these projects, and discuss ideas for further opportunities, before opening for questions from the audience.
Best Practice Presentations
Speaker(s)


	Fabrizio Celli
Fabrizio Celli
Fabrizio Celli received the MSc in Computer Science and Engineering from the University of Rome "Roma Tre" in 2009. He also received the BSc in Psychology from the University of Rome "La Sapienza" in 2015. Currently working for the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), he has 11 years of experience as a software engineer. His major skills are web application development, search engines, linked open data, big data, machine learning, and IT security. He has interests in Neuroscience and Theoretical Physics.

Abstract
AGRIS, the International System for Agricultural Science and Technology, is a multilingual bibliographic database that connects users directly to a rich collection of research and worldwide technical information on food and agriculture. AGRIS has a network of almost 500 data providers that have contributed to the growth of the database since 1974. Considering the high number of data providers and their diversity, AGRIS must cope with several challenges to integrate and ingest data from all existing data sources, like the existence of several metadata formats and different standards in terms of metadata quality. In addition, with the continuous growth of open repositories and the publication of APIs to harvest data, AGRIS has started the process of automating the ingestion of data in its database. The adoption of machine learning algorithms (neural networks) and controlled vocabularies like AGROVOC play a key role in content understanding and classification of high-volume data, allowing correct data discovery and integration. Intended audience: librarians, information managers, anyone who wants to contribute to AGRIS
Speaker(s)


	Joachim Neubert
Joachim Neubert
Joachim Neubert works as a scientific software developer at the ZBW – Leibniz Information Centre for Economics. He published the [STW Thesaurus for Economics](https://zbw.eu/stw) and the 20th Century Press Archives as Linked Open Data and developed linked data based web services for economics. He is working on the integration of knowledge organization systems into applications and on mappings between such systems, and is exploring the new potentials of Wikidata as a linking hub for resources on the web.

Abstract
The [20th Century Press Archives](http://webopac.hwwa.de/pressemappe20) (PM20) is a large collection of folders with millions of press clippings and other material about persons, organizations, wares, events and general subjects. Founded in 1908 in Germany, the archive soon extended its coverage to newspapers all over the world, kept up till 2005. Today it is a special collection, which is not part of the core business of the owning institution any more. Yet, as the most comprehensive public press archives worldwide it is still of great interest to a broader community. While further-on providing storage and access to the digitized folders on its web site, ZBW is donating the rich PM20 metadata to Wikidata, the free knowledge base backing multiple Wikipedias. There it is put in context and can be improved and enhanced by everybody. That will hopefully boost discoverability and make the data much more usefull. The process of integrating the PM20 metadata into the item and property structures of Wikidata has been completed for the biographical archives and is on the way for the large countries/subject archives. The presentation will touch tools used as well as the Wikidata [WikiProject 20th Century Press Archives](https://www.wikidata.org/wiki/Wikidata:WikiProject_20th_Century_Press_Archives) and community communication.
Speaker(s)


	Cuijuan Xia
Cuijuan Xia
Xia Cuijuan is the senior engineer and researcher of Shanghai Library System and Network Center, team leader of the Digital Humanities projects. Her research focuses on Metadata, Ontology, Knowledge Organization, Linked Data, and Digital Humanities. She published more than 40 papers in Journal of Library Science in China, Journal of Academic Libraries, Library Tribune, Library Journal, Library and Information Science and other academic journals.

Abstract
Digital Humanities is not only the innovation of the research paradigm of humanities research, but also means a brand-new mode of knowledge production and knowledge communication. Therefore, there comes a trend that it needs libraries to integrate digital collections and historical and humanities data for researchers in various fields. As a research-oriented public library, Shanghai Library has a large number of digital historical resources, especially pre-modern newspaper and journal resources, as well as research data and service experience accumulated by librarians and experts from the field of history and humanities. In the past few years, Shanghai Library has launched a number of Digital Humanities projects, using Linked Data, Big Data, visualization, AR and other technologies to carry out datalization and knowledge reorganization of ancient books, genealogy, manuscripts, archives, multimedia resources and experts' research results, so as to support the new human research methods such as data-driven quantitative analysis, visual display, text analysis, social network relationship analysis, geospatial analysis and so on. Based on the existing Digital Humanities projects, the "Historical Humanities Big Data Platform" launched in 2020 integrates human resources of many departments of Shanghai Library, trying to seek new breakthroughs in more complete personnel composition, more resource types, larger data scale, new technology application and better service experience. This presentation takes the implementation of the prototype system of "Historical Humanities Big Data Platform" as an example, introduces the short, medium and long-term goals and current progress of the platform, as well as the methods, technologies and paths used in the implementation process of the platform, and looks forward to the trend and Prospect of the development and utilization of historical and cultural resources and data of the library in the environment of Digital Humanity.
Speaker(s)


	Xiaoying Zhou
Xiaoying Zhou
Xiaoying Zhou, female, Ph.D., librarian, Digital Resources Integration Team deputy leader of Chinese National Library Digital Resources Department, postdoctoral student of the Chinese National Library Research Institute, research expertise: knowledge organization, data mining, digital resource integration.

Abstract
The processing of digital resources in libraries has experienced the development of digitization, modelling, and semantic analysis, began to explore the deeper semantic relationship between the knowledge contained in digital resources. This presentation will introduce the representative practical achievements of the National Library of China from two parts of the semantic organization process: semantic mining and data association. For the Semantic mining part, this presentation takes the digital genealogy indexing project and the newspaper visualization database as an example to introduce the deep semantic annotation technology and visualization model of digital cultural heritage resources; For the data association part, this presentation takes the multimedia-Chinese National Library open online courses as an example to introduce the semantic transformation of video metadata and the release of linked data, and briefly introduces the disclosure platform to demonstrate how to complete SPARQL query and data set download. Finally, this presentation analyzes the key technologies of the semantic organization of library digital resources, points out that there are still difficulties with the semantic metadata standardization, data interoperability and user-oriented knowledge services.
Speaker(s)


	Sophy Chen
Sophy Chen
Sophy Shu-Jiun Chen is the Assistant Research Fellow at the Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica, and also the Executive Secretary of Academia Sinica Center for Digital Cultures(ASCDC). She received her M.A. degree in Information Studies from the University of Sheffield, UK in 1997, and Ph.D. degree in Library and Information Science from the National Taiwan University in 2012. Dr. Chen is also an Adjunct Assistant Professor of the Graduate Institute of Library & Information Studies, National Taiwan Normal University. Her research interests include digital libraries, metadata, ontologies, Linked Data, knowledge organization, and digital humanities. She initiated the Research Project of Chinese-language AAT (Art & Architecture Thesaurus) with the Getty Research Institute, USA since 2008, and founded the LODLab@ASCDC since 2018.



	Lu-Yen Lu
Lu-Yen Lu
Currently worked as a research assistant in the LODLab at the Academia Sinica Center for Digital Cultures(ASCDC) in Taiwan (ROC) since 2016. His major interests lie in the semantic data model design for data object-related cultural heritage information, pre-processing for LOD-based data conversion, and application of LOD datasets for textual and visual studies enhancing the field of digital humanities research.

Abstract
Linked Data (or Linked Open Data, LOD) can be applied not only as an effective method to integrate description-based data from different sources, but also to support digital humanities focusing on image-based content with implementation of other technical standards. This study takes information from the wooden slip relics of the Chinese Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD) and the ancient Chinese characters written on them, as an example case to report how the combination of linked data, an integrative Chinese Wooden Slips Ontology, and the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF) can facilitate digital humanities (DH) research, especially for interpreting ancient Chinese characters. The study is based on the results of the “Wooden Slips Character Dictionary” (簡牘字典系統/ WCD), launched by the Academia Sinica Center for Digital Cultures (ASCDC) as an online system to demonstrate the possibility of integrative application of different ontologies and vocabularies to deal with linked data for DH research. To achieve the aforesaid purpose, the study has developed an “integrative Chinese Wooden Slips Ontology.” The main purpose of the ontological design is to support DH scholarship in the research field of ancient Chinese characters and their interpretation, and also serve as a basic data model for structuring an online retrieval system of Chinese characters across different institutes. The integrative Chinese Wooden Slips Ontology is designed based on the CIDOC-CRM model, which contains four different data models of specific fields to enhance the detailed and accurate description of single wooden slips and the information about each written character. The CRM-based data model is extended to enrich the detailed data on each written Chinese character, including temporal information of work production and annotation for the whole wooden slip or a single character. As a result, the CRM classes are extended as nodes to link with the different types of this integrative Chinese Wooden Slips Ontology. Since the ancient Chinese characters are written on fragile materials and easily become damaged or unrecognizable over time, the interpretation process of these characters has to rely on the support both of images and their metadata retrieval through sematic methods, such as IIIF and Linked Data. To read, recognize and compare writing manners between the same or similar written characters is one of the important methods used to interpret characters accurately. IIIF-based retrieval systems can help scholars to conduct research in a visually comfortable way. While interpreting the precise meaning of a written character within the whole text, obtaining information about the composition or annotation of a Chinese ancient glyph must depend on the LOD-based retrieval approach. ASCDC’s “Chinese characters and character realization ontology” and the “Web Annotation on Cultural heritage ontology” might offer a new approach to analyze this Chinese ancient cultural heritage via semantic methods. To extend and enhance the preliminary research results, images of single characters in the WCD system are further interoperated and retrievable in the union catalog of the “Multi-database Search System for Historical Chinese Characters” based on the IIIF-based API, which is established in cooperation with other international research communities, including the Nara National Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Historiographical Institute of the University of Tokyo, National Institute of Japanese Language, National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics, and Institute for Research in Humanities at Kyoto University in Japan. The same Chinese characters from datasets of different institutes can be displayed in this collective interface, which supports the study of ancient Chinese characters. Links: 1. Wooden Slips Character Dictionary: https://wcd-ihp.ascdc.sinica.edu.tw/woodslip/ 2. Multi-database Search System for Historical Chinese Characters: https://wcd-ihp.ascdc.sinica.edu.tw/union/
Speaker(s)


	Guojian Xian
Guojian Xian
Professor, the director of the business department of National Agricultural Library, Agricultural Information Institute of CAAS. He focuses on the research and practice of digital processing of agricultural information resources, multi-source heterogeneous big data fusion, data opening and sharing, as well as thesaurus, ontology, authority file, linked data and knowledge graph. He presided and participated in the National Key Technology Support Program "Construction and Demonstration Application of Knowledge Organization System for Foreign Language Science and Technology Literature Information", "Agricultural Scientific Data Sharing Center" project of Ministry Of Science and Technology, the National Natural Science Foundation of China project "The Construction and Translation Research of Agricultural Ontology", Chinese Academy Of Engineering Knowledge Center construction project, the EU's seventh framework project and FAO international cooperation project, etc. He has won 4 awards for scientific and technological achievements, obtained more than 10 computer software copyright registrations, published more than 50 papers, and published 4 books.



	Jiao Li
Jiao Li
Doctor in Information Management, the member of Knowledge Organization & Intelligent Computing Research Group in Agricultural Information Institute of CAAS. She mainly research on linked data, knowledge graph and semantic analysis.

Abstract
Due to the virtue of resource mapping at a hierarchic level and graph-based representation, RDF data shows promising for data reuse and federation on the Web where both documents and data are linked. There are numerous tools or frameworks used by the Linked Data community, a comprehensive survey, focusing on their objectives, methodologies and most distinctive characteristics, is given in this presentation to gain an overall view of current research trends. Furthermore, Agricultural Information Institution of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Science (CAAS AII) has provided a new approach to RDF generation and management in an ETL (Extract-Transform-Load) environment, this presentation will share the plugin developed based on open-source Kettle, which can support RDF schema dynamic mapping and triples transformation for a wide variety of data sources, i.e., the shift from internal or open data in relational databases or files containing structured data such as Excel, CSV, XML and JSON files to RDF data.
Speaker(s)


	Nuno Freire
Nuno Freire
Nuno Freire holds a PhD in Informatics and Computer Engineering from the University of Lisbon. He conducts his research at INESC-ID, and his areas of interest include information systems, data integration, information extraction, data quality, knowledge representation, and information retrieval. His main domain of interest is his cultural heritage, and works jointly with the Europeana R&D, with research interests in novel methods for data aggregation, and in data modelling for the maintenance and evolution of the Europeana Data Model. He has been a member of the Program Committees of major international conferences in the area of digital libraries: JCDL (Joint Conference on Digital Libraries) and TPDL (Theory and Practice in Digital Libraries), SEMANTiCS and reviewer for the International Journal on Digital Libraries.



	Antoine Isaac
Antoine Isaac
Antoine Isaac (Europeana Foundation) works as R&D Manager for Europeana. He has been researching and promoting the use of Semantic Web and Linked Data technology in culture since his PhD studies at Paris-Sorbonne and the Institut National de l’Audiovisuel. He has especially worked on the representation and interoperability of collections and their vocabularies. He has served in other related W3C efforts, for example on SKOS, Library Linked Data, Data on the Web Best Practices, Data Exchange. He co-chairs the Technical Working Group of the RightsStatements.org initiative and the Discovery Technical Specification Group at the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF).

Abstract
The Europeana Data Model (EDM) is the data model that allows Europeana to maintain a sustainable aggregation (and publication) of metadata about digital representations of culture artefacts, supporting contextualization and multilinguality. EDM is built in accordance with best practices for publishing data on the web. It is a community-based effort, involving representatives from all the domains represented in Europeana: libraries, museums, archives, and galleries. It was initially defined in 2010 and has been under continuous improvement since, under the coordination and maintenance of Europeana. Building on our DCMI best practices presentation in 2019, we will concretely illustrate how these best practices have been followed in the most recent developments for EDM. We will present the EDM extension for modeling full-text contents and how it supports Europeana’s IIIF API and the viewing of IIIF full-text objects in the Europeana portal. We will discuss the role that EDM, in conjunction with the RightStatements.org initiative, plays for enhancing the sharing of rights metadata across the Europeana Network, especially through validation and interoperability. Finally, we will present how EDM was extended along the lines defined by the W3C Data Quality Vocabulary, in relation with the Europeana Publishing Framework.
Speaker(s)


	Wirapong Chansanam
Wirapong Chansanam
Wirapong Chansanam is an assistant professor at the Department of Information Science, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Khon Kaen University, Thailand. He has been working as a lecturer for more than 10 years in the field of information technology, information science, digital humanities, and business computing at Chaiyaphum Rajabhat University and Khon Kaen University, Thailand.



	Kulthida Tuamsuk
Kulthida Tuamsuk
Kulthida Tuamsuk, dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at Khon Kaen University, Thailand. She is a founder of the Digital Humanities Research Group and being known as a research who has published several international papers in the fields of digital humanities, digital content management, knowledge organization, and digital archives.

Abstract
One of the most significant challenges in digital humanities research is the archiving, accessing, linking, and analyzing data from many different resources, which is called semantic integration. Semantic integration is the process of using a conceptual representation of the data and their relationships, which is the ontology, to eliminate possible heterogeneities. Ontologies can be used for integration architecture, where metadata from different sources can be mapped and integrated. This paper aims for exploring on the use of metadata and ontologies to develop semantic integration of Thai culture research from different databases. The Thai culture domain is focusing on 'Heet Sib Song' which is the traditional twelve months fesitval that well recognized in the northeast of Thailand. We use the Ontology Development 1010 as a conceptual representation of Heet Sib Song domain to create semantic integration of metadata from different databases and then the data will be mapped which can be used for further archiving and accessing in the future. In addition, the research activities on digital content management and system on cultrual heritages at the Digital Humanties Research Group, Khon Kaen University, Thailand will be presented. Keywords: Ontology, Metadata, Thai Culture, Heet Sib Song, Semantic Integration
Speaker(s)


	Tomoko Okuda
Tomoko Okuda
Chief, Standardization Section, Digital Information Distribution Division, Digital Information Department, National Diet Library, Japan



	Shihoko Yokota
Shihoko Yokota
Standardization Section, Digital Information Distribution Division, Digital Information Department, National Diet Library, Japan

Abstract
Japan Search, a platform for searching a wide variety of Japanese content ranging from published works, paintings, and cultural assets to broadcast programs and movies, is scheduled to be officially released in August, 2020. At the short paper session and Best Practice Day presentation of DC-2019, the National Diet Library of Japan, which developed the systems to operate Japan Search, explained the essentials of the project and gave an introduction to the Japan Search RDF schema, which was designed based on the RDF model with the aim of facilitating the distribution and sharing of metadata. This presentation is intended for librarians and those who are involved with cultural heritage, and will cover the recent improvements made to the schema, with a focus on methods taken to describe information on the access to and use of content as well as information on the provenance of metadata. A demonstration of how metadata from institutions participating in Japan Search are gathered by institutions which act as data aggregators and then transferred to Japan Search is also to be provided.
Speaker(s)


	Cindy Mitchell
Cindy Mitchell
Ms. Mitchell graduated from Carleton University in 1997 with a B.A. in Geography and has worked in Canada’s vibrant geomatics sector, both in the private and public sectors, for 23 years. A specialization in standardized geographic metadata brought her to Natural Resources Canada in 2001. Ms. Mitchell led a federal government-wide transition to one common geographic metadata (ISO 19115) between 2009 and 2014; following successful implementation, Ms. Mitchell led a multi-departmental team of experts in the creation of what became known as the Harmonized North American Profile of ISO 19115 –adding guidance and best practices to the existing profile to enable consistency and harmony in the whole-of-government implementation of this standard.

Abstract
Canada's Standard on Geospatial Data requires that federal government departments and agencies implement internationally recognized standards that support consistent data management and stewardship, and that increase the interoperability of geospatial information across government. This standard specifically requires the use of the ISO 19115 standard for geographic metadata. As federal departments and agencies worked together to implement this standard, and results were integrated within Canada's Federal Geospatial Platform, small but significant variations began to be apparent. Over 20 federal departments worked together to harmonize their implementation of the ISO standard for metadata, improving overall consistency and quality of metadata for Canada's geospatial data. This presentation will discuss the challenges and rewards of a broad enterprise application this metadata standard, in terms of Canada's experience, and will be of interest to those coordinating or consolidating metadata from multiple sources.
Speaker(s)


	Marie-Claude Côté
Marie-Claude Côté
Marie-Claude Côté is the Manager of Recordkeeping Strategies with the Archives Branch at Library and Archives Canada. In her role, she supports both Government of Canada (GC) institutions and Government archivists on good information management (IM) practices including digital recordkeeping, metadata, and record transfers. She previously held management and analyst positions at the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat, the Department of Canadian Heritage, the Canadian International Development Agency, and Industry Canada. After obtaining her Master’s Degree in Library and Information Science (MLIS), she worked in public and private sector libraries before joining the federal public service. For the last 23 years, she has contributed to the development of the IM domain in the GC. Marie-Claude also teaches the IM Curriculum at the Canada School of Public Service. She is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP).

Abstract
Library and Archives Canada (LAC), along with partnering Government of Canada (GC) institutions, has embarked on a number of pilot projects to transform the way it ingests digital documentary heritage for preservation and access to future generations. One pilot project consists of the electronic transfer of digital archival government records from the GC’s Electronic Document and Record Management System named GCdocs, powered by OpenText’s Content Server. Marie-Claude will provide an overview of the pilot project, LAC’s minimal metadata requirements, and the key role of metadata in the transfer workflow. She will then explain how the native metadata from OpenText’s Content Server are associated to the records, transformed in MODS, and packaged in XML, as well as how LAC uses this information to support its acquisition and preservation activities. This presentation will be of value to all metadata practitioners, especially those looking at ways to migrate records and associated metadata between systems, and those with an interest in digital preservation.
Speaker(s)


	Flor Trillo
Flor Trillo
Her career as a Mexican library manager has more than twenty years in a variety of libraries from different sectors such as private, public, national, and international organizations. She is a knowledge management expert; her areas of interest include scientific communication, research networks, and research data management. Ms. Trillo is currently attending a master program about “Intercultural Education between Europe and Latin-American” offered by the UNED in Spain. She earned her MLIS from the Universidad de la Habana, Cuba in 2011. She received a Post-Graduate Degree from the FLACSO Argentina in “Project Management applied to Libraries and Documentation Centers” in 2007. She graduated cum laude from the UNAM with a Bachelor's Degree in Library Science in 2001. Since the beginning of 2019, she works as a SOLO Librarian at CTBTO Preparatory Commission based in Vienna, Austria; in one of the four official headquarters of the United Nations.

Abstract
As a part of the report of the CTBTO Science and Technology (SnT) Conference held in Hofburg Palace, Vienna, Austria on 24-26 June 2019. The CTBTO Library has created an extensive analysis of international collaboration through key network visualizations to represent the knowledge transfer of 699 proposals compiled in a Book of Abstracts. In the context of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification system, these abstracts involved the participation of experts in nuclear test detection and on the infrastructure that underpins it. This massive event reached the attendance of more than 1,200 experts from international organizations, global policy-making, international collaboration, and citizen awareness attended; with more than 100 oral presentations and more than 300 poster presentations. In this framework, it was needed to represent the complexity of this universe from a different approach to analysis and determine the variety and diversity of international collaborations between: authors, keywords, institutions, and countries. This work was based on the use of the following software: a) Mendeley to create an accurate set of metadata such as titles, authors, abstracts, keywords, affiliations and countries; and b) VoSviewer to design network visualizations to express in one graphic representation its connections. The role of the Metadata during this analysis was crucial, because without the standardization of names, keywords, institutions, and countries. It would not have been possible to represent in one scheme all the relevant information behind each network analysis that expresses how the clusters are interconnected, its co-occurrence, its relatedness based on the frequency.
Speaker(s)


	Vasco Paul Kolmorgen
Vasco Paul Kolmorgen
Active in the railway sector for over 20 years and co-founder of the non-profit organization railML.org, dedicated to developing an industry standard of data exchange and prototyping applicative softward for the railway sector. Currently also the owner of the company Bahnkonzept.

Abstract
The presentation shall focus mainly on the use of Dublin Core metadata in railML and is therefore intended for developers or those with experience in the railway industry. It will also contain information on what railMK is, how it works, as well as who makes use of it. railML functions on the principle of referencing existing usable standards instead of developing all aspects from scratch and it can therefore be seen as an application of Dublin Core. Since Dublin Core has its background in library science, it makes this a great example for collaborative open source work and cooperation spanning across ectors, which might otherwise not have much in common.
Speaker(s)


	Hussein Suleman
Hussein Suleman
Hussein's research is situated within the Digital Libraries Laboratoryand the Centre in ICT for Development (ICT4D). His main researchinterests are in digital libraries, ICT4D, African language InformationRetrieval, cultural heritage preservation, Internet technology andeducational technology. He has in the past worked extensively onarchitecture, scalability and interoperability issues related to digitallibrary systems. He has worked closely with international and nationalpartnerships for metadata archiving, including: the Open ArchivesInitiative; Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations; andthe NRF-CHELSA South African National ETD Project. His recent researchhas a growing emphasis on the relationship between low resourceenvironments and such architectures. This has evolved into a focus onsocietal development and its alignment with digital libraries andinformation retrieval. He is currently collaborating with colleagues inarchiving and curation to develop a proof-of-concept low-resourcesoftware toolkit for robust long-term archiving.

Abstract
Many poor countries are unable to maintain metadata/data repositories for a variety of archival needs. Funding and skills constraints have a substantial impact, resulting in short-lived projects in the best case and non-starters in the worst case. In contrast, some of the more successful projects have avoided popular solutions in favour of simple and low-resource alternatives. This talk will present one approach currently being pursued to develop systems and workflows that closely match the needs of unskilled users without funding and will arguably result in simple preservation.
Speaker(s)


	Dave Clarke
David Clarke
Dave Clarke is co-founder and CEO of the Synaptica® group of companies, providers of enterprise software solutions for knowledge organization and discovery. He served on the authoring committee of the 2005 version of the US national standard for controlled vocabularies, ANSI/NISO Z39.19. Dave leads research and development at Synaptica, including software solutions for taxonomy and ontology management, text analytics and auto-categorization, image annotation and indexing, and Linked Data management. He is involved in educational outreach programs including LD4PE, the Linked Data for Professional Education initiative of DCMI. Synaptica software solutions have attracted numerous international awards including: Knowledge Management World magazine’s 100 Companies that Matter in KM and Trend Setting Product of the Year (multiple awards between 2011 and 2017). In 2016 Clarke was awarded the Knowledge Management Leadership Award by the Global Knowledge Management Congress. Dave is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, London, and a Leadership Fellow of St. George’s House, Windsor Castle.

Abstract
Taxonomists need to know how terms are being applied to content in order to effectively manage their taxonomies. If a concept that has been tagged to thousands of documents then it may need splitting into more granular concepts. Conversely, if a concept has rarely been tagged to content then it may need to be withdrawn or merged with a more popular concept. Traditional library science developed a methodology known as ‘Posting Counts’ in which a metric is displayed within a thesaurus or taxonomy system to quantify the number of documents or pages each concept is indexed to. In 2019 Synaptica worked with a client who wanted to provide detailed information about tagged content directly within the taxonomy management system. This case study will review a solution in which an ontology was used to create content description profiles and bi-directional APIs were deployed so that when a page of content is tagged with a concept the process also creates a bibliographic record about that page within the taxonomy management system. The resulting solution provides users with an innovative ability to review qualitative as well as quantitative details about how any concept is being used. Links let taxonomists jump from concepts to content summaries and from there on to related concepts and related content without leaving the taxonomy management system.
Speaker(s)


	Ahava Cohen
Ahava Cohen
Ahava Cohen holds a doctorate in RDA from Bar Ilan University, Israel. She serves as head of the Hebrew cataloging department at the National Library of Israel and is a member of the Israeli Inter-University Cataloging Committee. She also teaches cataloging and classification in the David Yellin College MLIS program and heads the national continuing professional development program in cataloging. On the international front, Ahava is chair of the European RDA Interest Group (EURIG) and is the backup European representative to the RDA Steering Committee. Her research interests include multilingual access to library collections and ethics in working with multicultural patrons and resources.

Abstract
Library "foreign language" collections are native language collections for certain patrons, and in multilingual societies access to those collections can be unfairly restricted by libraries' choices of languages of cataloging and of access points. Israeli libraries have traditionally ensured access by cataloging in not one but four separate languages: Arabic, English, Hebrew, and Russian. Creating separate access points for each of these languages of cataloging did not solve the problem of allowing seamless access to collections by the majority of language groups within the country. Mazal, the new Israeli national authority file, does provide equal ease of access to all library collections from all major languages groups while maintaining enough connection to international standards of coding and content to allow for interoperability in standard integrated library systems. With the help of Ex Libris Group, Mazal's MARC-friendly solution is available for view within Alma community zone and the underlying structure is being made available for other multilingual societies which wish to allow all patrons access to resources across collections. This presentation will be of interest to those creating and accessing metadata in multiple languages and those interested in decolonizing library metadata.
Speaker(s)


	Myung-Ja Han
Myung-Ja Han
Myung-Ja (MJ) K. Han is a Professor and Metadata Librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests include interoperability of metadata, relationships between collection description and item-level metadata, issues on bibliographic control in the digital library environment, and semantic web and linked data.

Abstract
• Abstract: From May 2019 to April 2020, Program for Cooperative Cataloging (PCC)’s the Task Group on Metadata Application Profiles (MAPs) worked to identify and understand the issues and practices associated with the creation and management of MAPs within the PCC context, such as defining MAPs in the context of PCC, use cases and requirements, base-model assumptions, and maintenance/governance models. This presentation will share the Group’s findings as well as recommended actions critical to the successful development, implementation, and maintenance of PCC MAPs. • Intended Audience: MAP Developers, Metadata Librarians, Linked Data Implementers
Speaker(s)


	Humphrey Keah
Humphrey Keah
Humphrey Keah is an information and knowledge management practitioner whose 20 years of research support experience spans the natural sciences and the humanities and social sciences. Recently he won the 2020 InforShare award on International Information Issues by the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T). Humphrey was instrumental in linking African universities and the global iSchools Digital Humanities Curriculum Committee (iDHCC). Currently he is leading knowledge management initiatives at the Centre for Health Literacy and Quality-Kenya (CHLQ-K) while undertaking doctoral research with special interests in semantic web applications for research and cultural heritage institutions. Previously Humphrey worked at the World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), the Library of Congress field office in Nairobi, the French Institute for Research in Africa (IFRA-Nairobi) and Environment Liaison Centre International (ELCI). Humphrey has teaching experience as Computer Instructor at INTEL College and Assistant Lecturer at the Technical University of Kenya (TUK). He speaks fluent French and has MSc. in IT and BSc. in Information Science from Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya.



	Jane Wambugu
Jane Wambugu
Jane Wambugu has worked with the Ministry of Agriculture as an Agriculture and Home Economists for 27 years. She has mainstreamed nutrition in departments (Crops, Livestock and Fisheries) as well as forming a link between Ministry of Agriculture and Ministry of Health through the Agri-Nutrition Linkages Technical Working Group. This link has enabled the two ministries to jointly work together on nutrition interventions. As head of unit, Jane brought several partners together, held three (3) Agri-Nutrition Regional and National Conferences and supported the development of several documents that link Agriculture and Nutrition. In response to Covid -19 pandemic she coordinated development of national guidelines and 1 million Kitchen garden initiative for all the 47 counties. Jane Holds a Bachelor degree in Agriculture and Home Economics from Egerton University and a Masters in Management of Development Specializing in Training, Rural Extension and Training from Wageningen University, The Netherlands.



	George Obanyi
George Obanyi
George Nyairo Obanyi holds master’s degree in communication, Postgraduate Diploma in Journalism from the University of Nairobi and a Bachelor of Education from Kenyatta University. Mr. Obanyi has been involved in communications for development organizations and projects for the past 20 years. He has been involved in designing, implementing and evaluating strategic communication programs across several sectors. He has facilitated knowledge management projects and communication training workshops. Currently, he is Senior Technical Officer for Communication at FHI 360, an international development agency, where he provided communication support for the Kenya country office and projects. He is also the Chairman of the Association for Development Communication Practitioners in Kenya (AFDECOP). Mr. Obanyi has worked for the African Agricultural Technology Foundation (AATF), World Agroforestry Centre, International Institute of Rural Reconstruction (IIRR), Nation Media Group and The Standard Newspapers. Mr. Obanyi has also attended short courses on project management, policy communication, participatory communication approaches, social media for global health, ICT for development, social and behavior change communication.

Abstract
Through the Agri-Nutrition Linkages Technical Working Group, the Kenya Ministry of Agriculture has managed to mainstream nutrition in the departments of Crops, Livestock and Fisheries as well as form linkages with the Ministry of Health. This linkage has enabled the two ministries to collaborate on nutrition interventions. The Agri-Nutrition Linkages Technical Working Group has also brought together multisectoral partners and so far held three (3) successful Agri-Nutrition Regional and National Conferences resulting into several associated documentation linking Agriculture and Nutrition which need to be subjected to online discovery. Lately, in response to the Covid -19 pandemic the Agri-Nutrition Linkages Technical Working Group coordinated development of national guidelines and the 1 million kitchen garden initiative for the country’s 47 counties. This best practice presentation showcases how interdisciplinary collaboration between the domains of Agriculture, Health and multisectoral partners contributing to a common agendum (Agri-Nutrition) can facilitate metadata development for a central online repository which can serve as a metadata harvesting proxy leading to knowledge discovery through semantic web applications such as the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)’s AGRIS database and the Open Metadata Registry. The intended audience of this presentation include metadata specialists, researchers and decision makers in the domains of agri-nutrition, agriculture, health, as well as librarians and knowledge management specialists.
Speaker(s)


	Trevor Watkins
Trevor Watkins
Trevor Watkins is the Teaching and Outreach Librarian at George Mason University and is the Technical Lead and Chair of the Web Committee of Project STAND. His research interests include Artificial Intelligence, STEM Librarianship, information literacy integration models, open knowledge diffusion tools, and teaching and learning theories in non-traditional spaces. Mr. Watkins holds a MS in Information Architecture and Knowledge Management and a MS in Library Information Science from Kent State University, and a MS in Computing and Information Systems from Youngstown State University. Mr. Watkins has been the recipient of multiple NSF Scholarships, and has authored and co-authored a book, published papers and presentations at conferences. Some of his current projects are Black Squirrel GNU/Linux operating system, Cosmology of Artificial Intelligence, and Tami II.



	Lae’l Hughes-Watkins
Lae’l Hughes-Watkins
Lae’l Hughes-Watkins is the University Archivist for the University of Maryland She is the Founder of Project STAND, and her research areas focus on outreach to marginalized communities, documenting student activism within disenfranchised populations, and utilizing narratives of oppressed voices within the curricula of post-secondary education spaces. Her most recent publication is "Moving Toward a Reparative Archive: A Roadmap for a Holistic Approach to Disrupting Homogenous Histories in Academic Repositories and Creating Inclusive Spaces for Marginalized Voices," Journal of Contemporary Archival Studies: Vol. 5 , Article 6. She is also a 2019 Mover and Shaker, serves on SAA’s Nominating Committee 2019-2020, ARL LCDP 2018-2019, a recipient of SOA Merit Award for 2018.



	Valencia Johnson
Valencia Johnson
Valencia L. Johnson is the Project Archivist for Student Life at Princeton University. She engages with student organizations on managing and preserving their records, in analog and born-digital formats. As the creator of Amp Up Your Archives, she works to create programs to inspire students to view their records and materials as important documentation that is an equal to the administrative record of the university.



	Shannon Walker
Shannon Walker
Shannon Walker is the Assistant University Archivist at ASU. For the last seven years Shannon has overseen the archival collections at Thunderbird School of Global Management, the last two years splitting her time between the Glendale campus and Archives & Special Collections in the Hayden Library. Prior to Thunderbird she had stints in the Western History & Genealogy Department at the Denver Public Library and at the Getty Conservation Institute library in Los Angeles. Her background is working with photograph and print archives, in academic, public and museum libraries. Her professional interests are in digitization, interpretation, and access to collections. She received her MLIS from the University of Denver, with a concentration in Archives. She is a member of the Arizona State Historical Records Advisory Board (AHRAB) and has actively served on the Arizona Archives Summit planning committee



	Chris Wydman
Chris Wydman
Chris Wydman is the University Archivist and Records Manager in the Department of Special Collections & Archives at Wright State University. Chris has worked in the department since 2005, where he leads the university records management program and is charged with the management of the university’s historical archives. Chris is a strong advocate of public history and community archiving initiatives, and has participated in numerous outreach projects with the communities of Southwest Ohio and beyond. Chris serves as a faculty adjunct in the Department of History where he teaches several courses for the Public History M.A. program, including Introduction to Archives and Manuscripts, Public History Field Study, and Information Management. Chris holds a B.A. in history and a M.A. in public history, both from Wright State University.

Abstract
Project STAND is an online resource that was established as a centralized access point to bring together academic institutions to share historical and archival documentation on student dissent, collections and materials with a focus on marginalized student identities (African Americans, LGBTQ, LatinX, Asian Americans, indigenous, differently abled, etc), and best practices for archiving born-digital records of marginalized identities. In this presentation, we discuss the various components of creating this portal including Project STAND Controlled Vocabulary Builder, glossary of student activism, metadata schema, site architecture, value of the collections, collection assessment process, and the challenges of site security, interoperability and creating a unified portal in the first phase of this project. We conclude with a brief discussion on the next phase of linking student activism across member institutions.